Farmer working on coffee field at sunset outdoor

Mexico

HISTORY

First introduced to Mexico and planted in the late 18th century, the coffee industry didn't really become active until the late 19th and early 20th centuries, with greater focus previously on the country's rich mineral deposits and mining opportunities, after Mexican independence and the redistribution of land establishing smallholder farmers.


The short-lived national coffee association INMECAFE was established by the government late in the 20th century to help support coffee farmers but was dissolved in 1989, with an inevitable impact on quality of coffee production from the region. However, an increase in focus on the small-farmer cooperative organization and recent interest and attention given to Fair Trade certifications has helped to rebrand Mexican coffee to reflect sustainability and affordability.


Mexico has been plagued by coffee-leaf rust and other pathogens which have reduced yield and quality in recent years, and yet Mexico has delivered some amazing cups from its quality-inclined growers and associations.



FAIR TRADE AND ORGANIC

Mexico's coffee industry has attempted to differentiate itself through the provision of an abundance of Fair Trade and organic certified coffee, especially in areas such as Chiapas, Oaxaca, and Veracruz. Traditional growing philosophies continue to influence the practices of much of the indigenous farming community. Fair Trade has also worked to encourage smallholders to form cooperatives, pooling resources and improving access to financing, ultimately providing greater presence in the international markets

Overview

GROWING REGIONS

Chiapas, Colima, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Michoagan, Nayaritt, Oaxaca, Puebla, San Luis Potosi, Veracruz


COMMON VARIETIES

Bourbon, Typica, Caturra, Mundo Novo, Maragogype, Catimor, Catuai and Garnica


PROCESSING METHODS

Washed or mechanically demucilaged


HARVEST PERIOD

November – March