Coffee Plant in the Mountains of Peru

Peru

HISTORY

Early in the 20th century the British government accepted roughly 2 million hectares of land from the Peruvian government in settlement of a defaulted loan. Much of this land subsequently became British-owned coffee plantations and marked the beginning of cultivation of coffee for export from Peru, although coffee had been first planted in Peru in the mid-18th century.


The large British-owned plantations were gradually sold or redistributed throughout the 20th century to indigenous smallholders, increasing their independence but without access to the resources and infrastructure they required. Around 30 percent of the country's smallholders are members of a democratic co-operative which has improved the marketing and awareness of Peruvian coffee but has done little to highlight the high-quality lots.


Over the last decade Peru has been noted as being one of the world's top coffee producing nations although the very small size of the average farm, coupled with the remoteness, has prevented the single-farm differentiation supporting the increased focus on microlots. Peru does have a large number of certified-organic, Fair Trade, Rainforest Alliance and UTZ-certified coffees. The lush highlands and good heirloom varieties are great signs for the future development of specialty coffees from Peru.

Overview

GROWING REGIONS

Amazonas, Ayacucho, Cajamarca, Cusco, Huánaco, Junin, Pura, Puno, Villa Rica


COMMON VARIETIES

Bourbon, Typica, Catuai, Caturra, Mundo Novo, Pache


PROCESSING METHODS

Washed


HARVEST PERIOD

June – September